Non-Fiction Books I want to read

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“You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” Jim Rohn

 

We may not always find ourselves in the company of brilliant people. But books have allowed me to surround myself with people who are not just like-minded but way smarter than me. In the past couple of years, I have become more mindful of the people I spend my time with. I cannot always control it, and so there is where books come into play. Intelligent conversations, expertise, experience, whatever I want from the company I can get that from books.

So, I have decided to read more non-fiction this year. To be particular, I have decided to read six specific non-fiction this year. Albeit I’ll be reading a few on how to improve the craft of writing and how to parent my child, I am specifically going to share the ones that are about personal development because that’s what I think you’ll be interested in.

You can follow me on Goodreads to see what I read when I read them and what are my thoughts about these books.

So here we go;

I am currently reading Girl Wash Your Face by Rachel Hollis. I have been talking about this one on my Instagram lately so you might already know what I think about this book. There are so many takeaways from this book, where do I start. Every chapter or almost every chapter has been like — I wish I had read something like this in my early twenties. Or — why wasn’t this book written when I was a ‘new adult.’ Can I just say that the way @msrachelhollis has addressed sex in chapter 7 The Lie: I’m Bad at Sex, is eye-opening for the simple fact that we need to have more conversations like this for the sake of being and raising healthy adults. Book talk coming soon.

 

Peak Performance by Brad Stulberg, Steve Magness A few common principles drive performance, regardless of the field or the task at hand. Whether someone is trying to qualify for the Olympics, break ground in mathematical theory or craft an artistic masterpiece, many of the practices that lead to great success are the same. In Peak Performance, Brad Stulberg, a former McKinsey, and Company consultant and journalist who covers health and the science of human performance, and Steve Magness, a performance scientist and coach of Olympic athletes, team up to demystify these practices and demonstrate how everyone can achieve their best.

 

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People Powerful Lessons in Personal Change by Stephen R. Covey

Stephen R. Covey's book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, has been a top seller for the simple reason that it ignores trends and pop psychology for proven principles of fairness, integrity, honesty, and human dignity. Celebrating its 15th year of helping people solve personal and professional problems, this special anniversary edition includes a new foreword and afterword written by Covey that explore whether the 7 Habits are still relevant and answer some of the most common questions he has received over the past 15 years.

 

Why do high schools and colleges require students to take courses in English, math and science, yet have absolutely no requirements for students to learn about personal money management? Why Didn't They Teach Me This in School? 99 Personal Money Management Lessons to Live By was initially developed by the author to pass on to his five children as they entered adulthood. As it developed, the author realized that personal money management skills were rarely taught in high schools, colleges, and even in MBA programs.

Unfortunately, books on the subject tend to be complicated and lengthy. This book includes eight important lessons focusing on 99 principles that will quickly and memorably enhance any individual's money management acumen. Unlike many of the personal money management books out there, this book is a quick, easily digested listen that focuses more on the qualitative side than the quantitative side of personal money management.

These principles are not from a text book. Rather, they are practical principles learned by the author as he navigated through his financial life. Many are unorthodox in order to be memorable and provoke deeper thought by the listener. Not only an excellent graduation gift for high school and college students but also a great book for any adult!

 

A young woman walks into a laboratory. Over the past two years, she has transformed almost every aspect of her life. She has quit smoking, run a marathon, and been promoted at work. The patterns inside her brain, neurologists discover, have fundamentally changed.

Marketers at Procter & Gamble study videos of people making their beds. They are desperately trying to figure out how to sell a new product called Febreze, on track to be one of the biggest flops in company history. Suddenly, one of them detects a nearly imperceptible pattern - and with a slight shift in advertising, Febreze goes on to earn a billion dollars a year.

An untested CEO takes over one of the largest companies in America. His first order of business is attacking a single pattern among his employees - how they approach worker safety - and soon the firm, Alcoa, becomes the top performer in the Dow Jones.

What do all these people have in common? They achieved success by focusing on the patterns that shape every aspect of our lives. They succeeded by transforming habits.

In The Power of Habit, award-winning New York Times business reporter Charles Duhigg takes us to the thrilling edge of scientific discoveries that explain why habits exist and how they can be changed. With penetrating intelligence and an ability to distill vast amounts of information into engrossing narratives, Duhigg brings to life a whole new understanding of human nature and its potential for transformation.

Along the way, we learn why some people and companies struggle to change, despite years of trying, while others seem to remake themselves overnight. We visit laboratories where neuroscientists explore how habits work and where, exactly, they reside in our brains. We discover how the right habits were crucial to the success of Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz, and civil-rights hero Martin Luther King, Jr. We go inside Procter & Gamble, Target superstores, Rick Warren’s Saddleback Church, NFL locker rooms, and the nation’s largest hospitals, and see how implementing so-called keystone habits can earn billions and mean the difference between failure and success, life and death.

At its core, The Power of Habit contains an exhilarating argument: The key to exercising regularly, losing weight, raising exceptional children, becoming more productive, building revolutionary companies and social movements, and achieving success is understanding how habits work.

Habits aren’t destiny. As Charles Duhigg shows, by harnessing this new science, we can transform our businesses, our communities, and our lives.

 

Do you read non-fiction? What are some of the books you like and would like to recommend? Leave me a comment below so I can check them out.